Disclosure of HIV Status by Gay & Bisexual Latino Men

Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (R01 MH60545)

The aim of this four-year research program was to refine and test a theoretical model of disclosure of HIV status among Latino gay and bisexual men developed by the investigative team. The model examined antecedents and consequences of disclosure of seropositive status.


Specific hypotheses were:

a) Sociocultural factors influence psychosocial factors which, along with HIV-related factors, influence degree of disclosure to the social network (family, friends, and sexual partners) and 
b) Disclosure of seropositive status to the social network is related to greater psychological well-being, which in turn decreases sexual risk, and promotes adherence to care.

In this study, A-CASI techniques were used to collect pilot data on 155 HIV-positive, self-identified gay or bisexual Latino men from New York City and Washington DC. The pilot data were used to refine new measures specifically developed for the study. In this sample, 88% of the participants reported they had revealed their status to their closest friends, 82% to their main partner, 34% to their mother, and 28% to their father. In the main part of the study, we collected data on 315 HIV-positive Latino (Spanish and English-speaking) and 76 HIV-positive Brazilian (predominantly Portuguese-speaking) gay and bisexual men in New York City and Washington DC.


PUBLICATIONS - Request an Article

Nakamura, N. & Zea, M. C.  (2009).  Experiences of homonegativity and sexual risk behavior in a sample of Latino MSM.  Culture, Health, and Sexuality. 12, 73-85.  First published on line, July 27, 2009. DOI: 10.1080/13691050903089961

Zea, M.C., Echeverry, J.J., Reisen, C.A., Poppen, P.J., & Bianchi, F. T.  (2008).  La revelación del estado de seropositividad al VIH positivo a las redes sociales de hombres gays Latinos.  En J. A. Pina, Lopez & J.J. Sánchez-Sosa (Eds.). Aportaciones de la psicología al problema de la infección por VIH:  Investigación e intervención  (pp. 261-280).Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico:  Plaza y Valdés.   

Zea, M.C. (2008).  Disclosure of HIV status and mental health among Latino men who have sex with men.  In S. Loue (editor). Health Issues Confronting Minority Men Who Have Sex with Men:  Voices from the Communities.  pp. 219-230.  New York:  Springer.

Zea, M. C., Reisen, C. A., Poppen, P. J., Bianchi, F. T., & Echeverry, J. J.  (2007).  Predictors of Disclosure of HIV-Positive serostatus among Latino Gay Men.  Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 13, 304-312.

Bianchi, F. T., Reisen, C. A., Zea, M. C., Poppen, P. J., & Echeverry, J. J.  (2006).  A comparison of HIV-related factors among seropositive Brazilian, South American, and Puerto Rican gay men in the US.  Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 28, 450-463.

Jernewall, N., Zea, M. C., Reisen, C. A., & Poppen, P. J.  (2005).  Complementary and alternative medicine and adherence to care among HIV-positive Latino gay and bisexual men.  AIDS Care, 17, 601-609.

Poppen, P. J., Reisen, C. A., Zea, M. C., Bianchi, F. T., & Echeverry, J. J.  (2005).  Serostatus disclosure, seroconcordance, partner relationship, and unprotected anal intercourse among HIV-positive Latino MSM.  AIDS Education & Prevention17, 228-238.

Zea, M. C., Reisen, C. A., Poppen, P. J., Bianchi, F. T., & Echeverry, J. J. (2005).  Disclosure of HIV status and Psychological Well-Being among Latino Gay and Bisexual Men.   AIDS & Behavior, 9, 15-26.

Poppen, P. J., Reisen, C. A., Zea, M. C., Bianchi, F. T., & Echeverry, J. J.  (2004). Predictors of unprotected anal intercourse among HIV-positive Latino gay and bisexual men.  AIDS & Behavior, 8, 379-389.

Zea, M. C., Reisen, C. A., Poppen, P. J., Echeverry, J. J., & Bianchi, F.  T.  (2004).  Disclosure of HIV-Positive Status to Latino Gay Men’s Social Networks.  American Journal of Community Psychology, 33, 107-116.

Bianchi, F.T., Zea, M. C., Reisen, C. A., Poppen, P. J., & Echeverry, J. J.  (2004).   Coping as a mediator of the impact of sociocultural factors on health behavior among HIV-positive Latino gay men.  Journal of Health Psychology, 19, 89-101.